Posts tagged #skin
Remember the Eyes

Imagine going to the beach. In a large beach bag is everything that’s going to be needed. A towel, lunch for the day, a few snacks and drinks, and of course, sunscreen. Sunscreen is one of the most important ways to protect your skin. When going out in the sun for long periods of time, ensuring full coverage is usually the goal. Some areas can be missed, however, which can result in sun damage.

Dermatologists also recommend an everyday SPF moisturizer for the face. A recent article from Reuters Health highlights a study showing it can be even more difficult to get full coverage. In the study, participants who were applying SPF sunscreen covered their entire face more often than those who were applying an SPF moisturizer (often missing the eyelids). While it is not yet known why the SPF moisturizer participants covered less of their face, it is a good reminder to thoroughly apply SPF moisturizer everyday. 

All in all, don’t forget the eyes, and any other areas exposed to daily sun like the hands, neck, and arms. If you don’t want leathery skin on your upper chest, apply an extra handful of sunscreen there during your daily routine! It’s important to apply and reapply!

Psoriasis v. Eczema: ENDGAME

Recently, “Rashes & Skin Allergy Testing,” was posted and it reviewed what eczema looks like and how allergy patch testing can be helpful. What many may not know is how psoriasis and eczema are related, yet, are significantly different. Come to Dermatology Arts in Bellevue for help understanding if you have one of these conditions.

Both psoriasis and eczema are red, itchy rashes that can appear as scales or plaques, be improved by topical steroids, and worsen with cold weather. But, what sets the two apart is very clear. Psoriasis, while red and itchy, has distinct borders and the skin is often raised. Eczema rashes have ill-defined borders, making it difficult to know when it starts and stops.

Common places for psoriasis to appear include the elbows, knees, and belly button. It can even cause symptoms affecting the fingernails. Psoriasis rashes result from an autoimmune disorder where an excess of skin builds up and doesn’t shed. Typical treatments can include topical steroids, but in more severe cases systemic medicines may be needed. Psoriasis is also associated with several other conditions such as high blood pressure and heart disease. Among those who have psoriasis, 5% can also experience psoriatic arthritis.  

Eczema, on the other hand, can improve with topical steroids and or several lifestyle changes like taking warm showers, avoiding harsh soaps, etc. Although eczema may show up in the same places as psoriasis, there is less skin buildup and inflammation. The underlying cause is also very  different. Triggers such as environment, bacteria, allergens, and genetics all play a role in severity, onset, and symptom improvement. Related diagnoses include allergies, keratosis pilaris, and asthma.

Neither psoriasis or eczema have a cure, but Dermatology Arts offers many treatment options that can control symptoms and prevent frequent flare ups. It can be difficult to tell the difference between psoriasis and eczema, but with a trained eye and many years of experience dermatologists can successfully diagnose and treat appropriately.

My Child’s Skin is _________:

Pediatric skin issues are one of the more long term struggles parents can face. From diaper dermatitis to teenage acne, the skin can be difficult to navigate.

Acne, warts, and atopic dermatitis (eczema) are three common diagnoses in pediatric dermatology cared for at Dermatology Arts. As children are developing and changing, the pH of the skin changes, leading to different reactions to different environments and products.

Infants are especially prone to eczema, as their skin is still developing and is being exposed to many new products. Diaper dermatitis can be caused by a wide variety of things. Allergens, irritants, an overgrowth of yeast, atopic dermatitis, and bacterial infections are all possibilities.

With high exposure to shared facilities such as playgrounds and toys, warts are especially easy for young children to pick up. Contagious and uncomfortable, warts can be treated with cryotherapy, salicylic acid (like Compound-W), and, at times, tissue scraping. Another virus is called Molluscum Contagiosum, which as the name implies, is highly contagious. Children acquire this condition in two peaks, at ages five and fifteen, with swimming pools and water slides thought to play a role in the spread of the condition.

Acne has a wide variety of treatment methods. Most people have heard of Accutane, but not many know there are several highly, effective, safe, inexpensive steps before Accutane. These include Retin-A (tretinoin), oral and systemic antibiotics, and/or cleanser changes. Hormonal treatments can also be considered in younger females with cyclical acne flares.

How do dermatologists know which treatment is right for each child’s skin? Why do some treatments work better than others? Although these questions can be difficult to answer, Dermatology Arts takes pride in being thorough with not only adult care, but also with pediatric skin care.

Get your moles checked!

May is filled with holidays, new spring weather, and more! What many may not know is May is Melanoma and Skin Cancer Awareness Month. Melanoma is a more serious skin cancer than non-melanoma skin cancers squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma. It can spread through your body, affect how long you live, and appear on parts of the body that have little sun exposure.

Those with a personal or family history of melanoma know it is important to get their skin checked regularly. Even first degree relatives since developing melanoma has a genetic component. Full body skin checks at Dermatology Arts can help evaluate spots you can’t see (on your back or between your toes), catch early signs of skin cancers, and even prevent melanoma from spreading to other parts of the body.

Knowing if a spot is concerning can be tricky. Many people have lots of moles, and it can be difficult to determine if any of them are changing. Having someone at home check hard to see places monthly can be helpful. See our post here for a few quick facts about Melanoma and enjoy a short video about checking loved ones’ spots!

Dermatology Arts' Liz Schuringa ARNP, is now Dermatology-Certified! Congratulations!

We are very excited to announce today that our own Liz Schuringa, ARNP has just become a Dermatology Certified Nurse Practitioner. Following approximately a decade in primary care, she transitioned to dermatology in 2017. She spent hundreds of hours studying (must have seemed like thousands to her!) and preparing for one of the most comprehensive tests available to Nurse Practitioners. Not only did she pass the exam, word on the street is that she ranks in the top 10% of test takers! Way to go!

Among many specialities within dermatology, Liz has cultivated an interest in acne for teens and adults and particularly adult female acne, and additionally leading our patch testing program for common skin allergens.